How to Check Database Response Time in Oracle 11g?

If you’re a senior enterprise database administrator, I’m sure you’ve heard “The problem is the database; it’s operating slowly” at least once.

If you’re a junior DBA, believe me when I say that you’ll hear it so much more times and more frequently than you’ll ever like on the job.

My personal experience has taught me that the problem is nearly always not in the database itself, despite the fact that practically all of the symptoms exhibit within it. Even so, you should always double-check since you never know.

Consider database performance in the same manner as end-users and developers consider “end response time”.

It makes no difference how experienced you are as a DBA. It will be difficult to determine if the database is sluggish or not if you do not have measurements, baselines, and appropriate application-response-time standards.

What is the database response time in oracle?

Service Time with Wait Time is the basic definition of Database Response Time.

Service Time (execution time) + Wait Time = Response Time

The time spent on the CPU for operations is referred to as service time.

Wait Time is the amount of time that a resource waits for another resource to become available before being processed by the CPU. The total amount of time spent waiting is known as wait time.

How to Check Database Response Time in Oracle 11g?

You may execute various queries on the Oracle v$tables to collect system metrics that can be an indicator of the Database’s a performance/response/ response times to check the GIS Database and ensure that response times are appropriate.

The query below can be used for manual database oversight because it produces numerous separate results that can be interpreted individually:

select CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'SQL Service Response Time' then 'SQL Service Response Time (secs)'
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then 'Response Time Per Txn (secs)'
ELSE METRIC_NAME
END METRIC_NAME,
CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'SQL Service Response Time' then ROUND((MINVAL / 100),2)
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then ROUND((MINVAL / 100),2)
ELSE MINVAL
END MININUM,
CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'SQL Service Response Time' then ROUND((MAXVAL / 100),2)
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then ROUND((MAXVAL / 100),2)
ELSE MAXVAL
END MAXIMUM,
CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'SQL Service Response Time' then ROUND((AVERAGE / 100),2)
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then ROUND((AVERAGE / 100),2)
ELSE AVERAGE
END AVERAGE
from SYS.V_$SYSMETRIC_SUMMARY
where METRIC_NAME in ('CPU Usage Per Sec',
'CPU Usage Per Txn',
'Database CPU Time Ratio',
'Database Wait Time Ratio',
'Executions Per Sec',
'Executions Per Txn',
'Response Time Per Txn',
'SQL Service Response Time',
'User Transaction Per Sec')
ORDER BY 1;

The various data, notably the Database CPU Time and Wait Time ratios, might identify where there may be any DB conflict.

The query should only be executed once when you know you’ll get good results from the database, such as after a DB Maintenance plan that rebuilds the indexes and recalculates statistics, including the Dictionary Statistics.

These values may then be used as a benchmark to determine whether the database is slowing down.

If you want to automate this procedure, the “Response Time Per Txn (secs)” indication is the most beneficial since it displays how quickly the database can handle a Transaction. As an example, you might use the query:

select CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then 'Response Time Per Txn (secs)'
ELSE METRIC_NAME
END METRIC_NAME,
CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then ROUND((MINVAL / 100),2)
ELSE MINVAL
END MININUM,
CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then ROUND((MAXVAL / 100),2)
ELSE MAXVAL
END MAXIMUM,
CASE METRIC_NAME
WHEN 'Response Time Per Txn' then ROUND((AVERAGE / 100),2)
ELSE AVERAGE
END AVERAGE
from SYS.V_$SYSMETRIC_SUMMARY
where METRIC_NAME in ('Response Time Per Txn')
ORDER BY 1;

Because this strategy just conducts a basic query on one of the system tables, it has a low impact on Oracle (or GIS) system resources, hence utilizing this query to monitor Database performance will have no detrimental influence on Database performance.

Analysis of Database Response Times: Why Is My Database So Slow?

This is a pretty typical problem that most SQL developers and DBAs run across on a daily basis, regardless of the relational database platform they’re working with. “How come my database is so slow?” This might be due to a variety of factors, one of which is difficult to pinpoint: poor query processing and prolonged wait periods.

Causes of Database Performance Issues

  • Network: There might be a problem with the network connection.
  • Server: The database may be operating on a server with a heavy workload, slowing database operations.
  • Database/Query: There might be duplicate query lines, complicated or looping syntaxes, query deadlocks, inappropriate database table partitioning, and so on.
  • Storage: RAID data striping difficulties, slow storage I/O operations

While network difficulties and server burden may be easily assessed using standard network and server monitoring tools, comprehending the following database and query-related questions is where the actual difficulty lies:

  • What is the slowest query?
  • How long does it take for an inquiry to be answered?
  • What is the cause of the query’s slowness?
  • What time of day/week did the performance effect occur?
  • What should I do to fix the problem?

The process of addressing the aforementioned questions by monitoring and evaluating query processing time and wait time, as well as researching query grammar to discover what makes the query difficult, is known as query response time analysis. The time it takes for a query to respond may be divided into two parts:

The actual operation time for the database to perform the query is known as query computation. This involves determining which step in the query transaction is generating the computation time and evaluating all of the phases involved in the query procedure.

Query wait time – the duration a database session spends awaiting for resources including a lock, a log file, or hundreds of many other wait events or wait for kinds to become available.

As a result, you now have a fast technique to determine whether or not your database is sluggish. Our production database is responding within the predicted time frame in this scenario. Obviously, if your database response time is slow, you should analyze the cause and, depending on the situation, take appropriate corrective action.

Remember that each application will have various response time requirements depending on the implementation; your task will be to determine if the response time is adequate or not based on the specifics of each circumstance.

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